1,000 Learners Later

1,000 Learners Later

An in-house solution to train logistics employees

Employee training is an integral part of any brokerage. Historically driven by shadowing current employees, success is primarily dependent on the strength of the trainer. And too often, the trainer is a successful employee that is either focused on managing their current work or removed from the day to day operations to support training. In both cases, something suffers – the training or the business operation. Overall, it is difficult to develop a successful employee training program in-house.

 

CLEAR GOALS > EMPLOYEE BUY-IN > CONSISTENT PARTICIPATION

Achieving employee buy-in and consistent participation are key to a successful education program. Even if your company has taken time to clarify with employees why investing in their professional development is important and peaked their interest, the long-term follow through often falls short. We are thrilled that our easy-to-use training platform has become the answer for 1,000 learners!.

 

TranStrategy Partners developed Brokertrain’s on-demand video training after hearing from industry professionals that training is a common problem. Our goal was to help businesses accelerate growth by empowering employees with on-demand training in sales, customer service, carrier development, marketing and leadership. Now, freight brokerage firms are using Brokertrain to increase client engagement, improve service and ignite employee productivity.

 

The course curriculum is based on 35 years of brokerage experience along with over 300 successful transportation business engagements. Courses are built around the defined education deficiencies and gaps to create a holistic approach to the industry. Through case studies, examples and best practices, learners can improve their skills in managing freight solutions, relationships and people.

 

We hope you will join the 1000 learners and businesses already building their competitive advantage through education with Brokertrain.

 

Styles in Profiles: Connecting across Psychological Dimensions

Styles in Profiles: Connecting across Psychological Dimensions

When approaching customers, it is essential to understand their buying styles – how they make decisions and how they interpret data to inform those decisions. While every person is unique, there are four basic buying styles from which one can establish sales communication and protocols: Decisive/Dominant; Influencing/Informational; Stable/Steady and Conscientious/Cautious. Understanding your own style (from a selling perspective), in conjunction with others (from a buying perspective), helps to act as a catalyst in the conversation and builds trust.

Dominant and Decisive Buyers

Decisive buyers are driven by the impact of new challenges and the authority to make decisions. They are often dominant in group situations and challenge the status quo. Innovation plays a keep role in developing ideas, but they are also distracted by the ‘shiny new object’ within the market. Decisive buyers focus on the bottom line and will look for a quick, impactful decision so they can move onto the next opportunity. They are often over aggressive and prone to confrontation to protect themselves from being taken advantage of.

When working with the Decisive buyer, be clear, concise and focus on the bottom line. Avoid overly complex explanations of features and benefits and comparative tactics. Focus on success and importance and the ‘rightness’ of the solution.

Influencing and Informational Buyers

Influencing buyer are driven by the acceptance in a collaborative environment. They are trusting and enthusiastic in their approach to new solutions. They look to broker deals, motivate their team and creatively solve problems. The influencing buyer may be more focused on fit and form over function. They are focused on creating an environment of trust and acceptance, but may ignore the details and specifics of what any change truly entails.

When working with an Influencing buyer, it is important to find the shared connections to build bonds and trust. Show how they will be the integrator of any solution. Avoid pressure and immediacy in the decision, but, instead, focus on praise and how the decision will satisfy their need for an environment free of friction and stress.

Stable and Steady Buyers

Steady buyers are driven by appreciation of their dependability and consistency. They are predictable and steadfast in their commitment to execution of work. Steady buyers are reliable and work well within the team structure along defined roles and responsibilities. They are resistant to change and will take longer to accept new processes or solutions. Driven by the sense of security, change should appear more incremental than disruptive for the Steady buyer.

When working with the Steady buyer, position your solution as a logical extension of the current process – one that fulfills current expectations and increases value. Avoid pressure and criticism on any current behavior, but show how the change is both clear (visually) and better (operationally).

Conscientious and Compliant Buyers

Conscientious buyers are driven by standards of high quality and logic. They are highly analytical and focused on precision. They heavily dependent on data, information and structure in making decisions. They are not swayed by emotion or innovation without the requisite research and study to support.

When working with the Conscientious buyer, focus on the details and provide the data, case studies and testimonials of others who have found success in your solutions. Avoid broad stroke statements and implications and never criticize the buyer or their current procedures. Focus on exploring possibilities that logically arise from your solutions and align them to the buyer’s methodology.

Each buyer is different. As such, your approach to each buyer must assert the correct information and communication styles to reach them. Preparation though knowledge of the buyer will help you to deliver a greater impact on their business success and your own.

Breaking Down Success – Simplify to Multiply

Breaking Down Success – Simplify to Multiply

How are you developing your relevance in a crowded marketplace?

Disruption of the marketplace happens when someone has the insight to question the status quo – the vision of what is possible in working out the solution to the challenges within a current process or business model. However, while the idea for change is important, it is truly the proper execution of that idea which defines success into this new paradigm.

Brokerage, as an intermediary business, in its simplest form, is the profitable connection between those with freight to move and those with the capacity to move it. How you make those connections and where you exert energies become your differentiation – your ‘secret sauce’. Some focus heavily on the freight owners, while others focus primarily on the carriers and others still on the technology portals. Ultimately, it is the service provided that makes the controllers of freight and capacity choose to work with a third party. It is the ease of use and the value of such service that makes them choose an option that costs more than connecting directly.

It is less about what you offer than about how your offering satisfies a need (or multiple needs). As a broker you provide access – to freight, to capacity, to information, to solutions. By knowing what the freight and capacity controllers need and how they can improve (financially or otherwise) through your options, you can create a long-term relationship that benefits all parties.

Information and its use are key components to making your business successful. Listening to podcasts, reading books, keeping up with trends and networking with your colleagues all play a part in growing your knowledge and information base. This knowledge allows you to speak directly to the prospects in their own language and with an empathy or their concerns, beliefs and challenges.

What you do differently is less important than how you do it and how you do it well in serving others. Be an expert in your field, but don’t limit your options by that expertise. Keep learning. Keep your people learning. Don’t limit your knowledge confined to transportation, but in other areas where service, connection and relationships play pivotal roles in growth.