How are you developing your relevance in a crowded marketplace?

Disruption of the marketplace happens when someone has the insight to question the status quo – the vision of what is possible in working out the solution to the challenges within a current process or business model. However, while the idea for change is important, it is truly the proper execution of that idea which defines success into this new paradigm.

Brokerage, as an intermediary business, in its simplest form, is the profitable connection between those with freight to move and those with the capacity to move it. How you make those connections and where you exert energies become your differentiation – your ‘secret sauce’. Some focus heavily on the freight owners, while others focus primarily on the carriers and others still on the technology portals. Ultimately, it is the service provided that makes the controllers of freight and capacity choose to work with a third party. It is the ease of use and the value of such service that makes them choose an option that costs more than connecting directly.

It is less about what you offer than about how your offering satisfies a need (or multiple needs). As a broker you provide access – to freight, to capacity, to information, to solutions. By knowing what the freight and capacity controllers need and how they can improve (financially or otherwise) through your options, you can create a long-term relationship that benefits all parties.

Information and its use are key components to making your business successful. Listening to podcasts, reading books, keeping up with trends and networking with your colleagues all play a part in growing your knowledge and information base. This knowledge allows you to speak directly to the prospects in their own language and with an empathy or their concerns, beliefs and challenges.

What you do differently is less important than how you do it and how you do it well in serving others. Be an expert in your field, but don’t limit your options by that expertise. Keep learning. Keep your people learning. Don’t limit your knowledge confined to transportation, but in other areas where service, connection and relationships play pivotal roles in growth.