You Train Everyday

You Train Everyday

Good leaders learn to play a myriad of different roles. They create vision. They communicate that vision. They hire. They fire. They develop teams. They create operational procedures. They create culture. They develop business relationships. They monitor finances, and the list goes on. But one of the most crucial responsibilities of a leader is often neglected: developing people.

If we were to interview future leaders and ask them why they wanted to be a leader within their company, we would probably hear answers pertaining to increased income, prestige, authority, freedom, and personal satisfaction. It would be rare to hear a fledgling leader talk about their desire to be in a position where they can help others better themselves both personally and professionally.

But I ask you, is development of others not a primary responsibility of leaders? Many leaders don’t recognize the need to develop people as one of their primary responsibilities. Others recognize the importance of this responsibility, but they don’t prioritize it or they don’t have the skills or resources to pull it off.

We wonder why our attrition rates are so high. We wonder why we can’t just get productive employees that don’t cause us any problems. Well, productive employees are not so much born as they are made. We need to invest the time, effort, and yes, dollars, to help these people reach their full potential. This is done through TRAINING and DEVELOPMENT.

Training programs come in two distinct forms, formal and informal. Every company has some type of formal training program even if it’s just; here’s your desk, here’s the employee handbook, here’s how to use our TMS, and here’s how to book a load. This piece of the formal training program tends to have a specific time frame attached to it and once it has been completed, there is little additional effort made for further development.

The piece that is often missing from the formal training program is the ongoing professional development that we all need. We need to provide employees the opportunity to grow professionally by providing them with opportunities to learn about skills such as customer service techniques, relationship development, effective communication, time management, conflict resolution, how to influence people, how to negotiate, how to be effective on the phone, having a positive attitude, etc.

The informal training happens on a daily basis as the employee becomes more deeply immersed in, and affected by, the culture of the organization. They are watching everyone else to see what the norms are. How are people treated? What can you get away with? What do people complain about? How are crises handled? What values are upheld and which ones don’t really matter?

You see, you train people and develop them whether you realize it or not. Training is happening constantly in your business. So, you can either just let it happen and evolve on its own (which usually does not end up being anything close to what you want it to be), or you can consciously, with strategic intent, develop all aspects of your training programs. Control the outcome by elevating the training programs to a priority within your company.

Why Your Sales Training Failed

Why Your Sales Training Failed

At TranStrategy Partners, we do a lot of sales training and we have a high success rate. We know sales training can significantly improve sales in an organization.

However, not all sales training works. This article is about why your sales training didn’t work.

The Feel Good Intervention

Sales training is the feel good intervention. When a sales manager sends one of his salesmen to sales training everybody feels good. The salesman is happy that his boss has decided to invest in his sales education. Perhaps the sales training will provide a process, messaging and approach that he never got from his company.

The sales manager gets to feel like an enlightened manager and hopefully get a nice ROI on her training investment. If she suspects she made a bad hire, maybe the sales training will redeem her low performing salesman.

With a little luck, the sales guy will get some silver bullets at class that will enable him to make some monster sales once the training is done.

Five Reasons Your Sales Training Didn’t Work

1. Lack of Management Support

Sales training, like every other corporate initiative, works best when there is management support. A company’s management must do more than pay for the sales training. Trainees need to know that their management values the training and expects their full attention. Ideally, management should participate in the training by introducing the trainer or attending the wrap-up session.

2. Poor Follow-up

To be effective, the attitudes, skills and knowledge gained in the sales training need to be turned into actions. Without implementation, there are no results and the training was a waste. At the end of the training, keep the trainees focused on the agreed upon changes and revise sales processes if required. Reinforcing the training will help the sales team to internalize the lessons from the sales training. Consider bringing the sales training reinforcement into the regular sales meetings.

3. No Competitive Advantage

The freight brokerage business is very competitive and it is important that companies develop a niche where they have a competitive advantage. There are a lot of freight brokers and 3PLs who sell a commoditized service, which makes sales much harder. The positive impacts of sales training can sometimes be limited by a lack of good market strategy.

4. Bad Company Culture

In our experience, sometimes a company’s culture can undermine sales. Training sales people won’t help grow a company’s revenues if the company culture is negative. Company culture is nothing more than the shared values and practices of the company’s employees. Company culture can be tricky and fragile. Even good leaders can find themselves stuck with a bad culture. To get the most out of sales training, first fix the culture.

5. Sales Process Not Aligned to Buying Process

To be successful, a company’s selling process must be aligned to the customer’s buying process. This means a company needs to understand their customers and how they buy freight brokerage services. For instance, if your company is looking for strategic customers, then your sales team should not use a transactional sales process. Your company’s lead generation, messaging and sales channels should also align to the buying process. Obviously, a company won’t be ready for sales training until they align their sales processes.

No Silver Bullet

Sales training is a great way to develop your people and grow your sales, but it is not a silver bullet. To grow your sales, develop a niche, put the right people and processes in place, and get a deep understanding of your customer’s problems and buying behaviors. Then, your company will benefit from a good sales training program.

That Which is Hidden Within

That Which is Hidden Within

“Nothing is more surprising or frightening than what one already knows.” Carlos Ruiz Zafon, The Labyrinth of the Spirits, 2018

Every brokerage business has the potential to become a thriving, successful enterprise. It is only a matter of vision, resources and the dedication to execution that either accelerate or limit the ability to achieve success. Business leaders must recognize and accept that change is a necessary part of growth and the key component to reaching organizational goals. Change must become an inherent and intentional feature of the vision and culture – in deciding how to deploy resources (dollars and people), in communication and in how the strategic initiatives are carried out by the team.

One of the greatest challenges for business leaders to overcome is the identification of where change needs to manifest within the organization. Too often it is identified as a sales issue or a productivity issue, when these are only symptoms of a larger issue related to strategic direction and/or culture. Objectivity is essential in identifying troubles and gaps in operational effectiveness.

Assess Your Business – Are the metrics you use effectively gauging your success?

As a leader, your feelings about the business are valid, but are often clouded by recent or long term operational prejudices. Having clear, and clean, ways to measure activity and productivity allow you to look at the business in an unfiltered way. These metrics should align with the behaviors that you want to encourage – whether phone activity, revenue creation or on time performance. Each of these activities must be tied to an organizational goal. Measurements and metrics that are arbitrary can misdirect your team’s energies and remove the focus from where it matters.

Define Success – Create the Vision

The overall vision for your company, again, needs to be clear and as simple as possible – to facilitate communication and to facilitate understanding. By having a specific point of success that you are trying to accomplish, it becomes easier to see and easier to internalize across the organization. Vision is accomplished through a variety of lenses – the telescope, the microscope and the mirror. The telescope provides a clarity on the long term and horizon-based strategy (tectonic), the microscope provides clarity on the smaller daily initiatives and changes (incremental), and the mirror provides clarity about the people (yourself included) who make the decisions about the future of the company (cultural).

Build Belief – Communicate and Compensate

When the vision presented is both clear and has value, the organization is positioned to succeed. Psychologically, people need to have a defined purpose to move them forward. Without a common goal that makes sense, people will revert to what makes sense for them (comfort) and their compensation design (security). When the vision, purpose, behaviors and compensation all follow the proper order, positive actions will begin to take place. People will find ways to achieve the vision. Innovation and creativity will overcome old obstacles and new challenges. When people know where they are going and work together they can see what the success can look like and take/make the necessary actions/decisions to bring the vision into reality.

Execute – Block, Tackle and Review

Intent and follow through remain the driving principles of execution. If there is truly belief and clarity in the vision, every action that serves this goal is the correct action to make. Review every decision through the lenses of the vision and measure it against the defined metrics to verify its quality against the process standards.

Lather, Rinse, Repeat.

With any process, each time it is completed, one can review what worked and what did not. Identifying performance issues and disconnects outline additional changes that can be improved for the next iteration. It is all there in front of you. It is just the matter of intent. Take control of your present, understand your past and direct the future.