Good leaders learn to play a myriad of different roles. They create vision. They communicate that vision. They hire. They fire. They develop teams. They create operational procedures. They create culture. They develop business relationships. They monitor finances, and the list goes on. But one of the most crucial responsibilities of a leader is often neglected: developing people.

If we were to interview future leaders and ask them why they wanted to be a leader within their company, we would probably hear answers pertaining to increased income, prestige, authority, freedom, and personal satisfaction. It would be rare to hear a fledgling leader talk about their desire to be in a position where they can help others better themselves both personally and professionally.

But I ask you, is development of others not a primary responsibility of leaders? Many leaders don’t recognize the need to develop people as one of their primary responsibilities. Others recognize the importance of this responsibility, but they don’t prioritize it or they don’t have the skills or resources to pull it off.

We wonder why our attrition rates are so high. We wonder why we can’t just get productive employees that don’t cause us any problems. Well, productive employees are not so much born as they are made. We need to invest the time, effort, and yes, dollars, to help these people reach their full potential. This is done through TRAINING and DEVELOPMENT.

Training programs come in two distinct forms, formal and informal. Every company has some type of formal training program even if it’s just; here’s your desk, here’s the employee handbook, here’s how to use our TMS, and here’s how to book a load. This piece of the formal training program tends to have a specific time frame attached to it and once it has been completed, there is little additional effort made for further development.

The piece that is often missing from the formal training program is the ongoing professional development that we all need. We need to provide employees the opportunity to grow professionally by providing them with opportunities to learn about skills such as customer service techniques, relationship development, effective communication, time management, conflict resolution, how to influence people, how to negotiate, how to be effective on the phone, having a positive attitude, etc.

The informal training happens on a daily basis as the employee becomes more deeply immersed in, and affected by, the culture of the organization. They are watching everyone else to see what the norms are. How are people treated? What can you get away with? What do people complain about? How are crises handled? What values are upheld and which ones don’t really matter?

You see, you train people and develop them whether you realize it or not. Training is happening constantly in your business. So, you can either just let it happen and evolve on its own (which usually does not end up being anything close to what you want it to be), or you can consciously, with strategic intent, develop all aspects of your training programs. Control the outcome by elevating the training programs to a priority within your company.