Manage Your Cash

Manage Your Cash

Managing your business’ cash is not something you should think about every once in a while. You must manage it every single day because cash fuels your business. It’s your business’ lifeblood. On a daily basis you should check how much money your business took in, how much it spent, and the status of your receivables. If you don’t do all of these things, you risk being blindsided by a cash shortfall, which could cripple your business.

If you don’t have the time to manage your business’ cash day to day, give that responsibility to someone who has the skills to do it and who you can trust to do it well.

Many new businesses do not pay enough attention to cash management because they are overly focused on generating sales.

There are several aspects to effective cash management. For example:

  • Use credit applications to figure out to whom you will extend credit and how much credit you will extend. Ask each of your customers to complete a credit application and then evaluate the information on each application using a credit scoring process.
  • Make timely billing a priority. The quicker you bill, the faster you will get paid and the less likely that you will have a problem with cash. Although a lot of businesses invoice once a week, I recommend that you invoice every day.
  • Understand how your customers handle their accounts payable and what you must do to ensure that they pay you as quickly as possible.
  • Monitor your accounts receivables on a daily basis and do not let bad debt accumulate. Even one past due account can have a big impact on your business’ financial health.
  • Use an electronic accounting system. If you don’t have one, get one!
  • Manage your credit relationships with your carriers as aggressively as you manage your shipper relationships.
Fixing Performance Problems

Fixing Performance Problems

A client reached out to me about performance issues within his team and I want to share it with you.

He owns a freight brokerage business that employs 10 brokers. Overall, he has a good team and his business is growing, so they are on the right track. However, he has some employees who have spotty performance when it comes to sales and customer service. He feels these people could be successful so he wants to help them get their performance up rather than letting them go.

Does this sound familiar to you? Maybe you have experienced a similar situation with your team.

This is a very frustrating problem for managers. Since the performance is spotty, it implies that sometimes they get the desired results and other times they fall short. Since you are having some success, we can assume that your employees will be successful if they follow your process and make the appropriate effort.

At TranStrategy Partners, we recommend using the following 4 step approach to helping your employees meet your performance standards:
Set Expectations. Create clear expectations for what you expect in terms of results. Also, communicate the processes for getting those results. When you set expectations, it is important that your employee understands exactly what you mean. If possible, have them articulate the direction in their own words (active listening). Sometimes, things that seem simple and direct in our heads are far less clear to the listener – this is especially true if you are an expert and they are a newbie.

Job Specific Training. A properly developed training program is a great way to communicate the goal and the processes needed to reach the goal. Ideally, your training should improve your employee’s attitude, skills and knowledge. Developing the right attitude about the goal and the approach is key. The right mental attitude will motivate your employee to gain the skills and knowledge necessary to succeed. Skills training will allow your employee to learn the specific skills needed for the job, like phone skills, customer service skills, TMS skills etc. Knowledge training refers to broader learning and practical understanding of a topic like supply chain, truck sizes, or industry best practices.

Inspection. After you have communicated your expectations and provided training, the next step is inspection. People do not always do what you expect, but they usually do what you inspect. Follow up with your under-performing broker to ensure they are doing exactly what you asked them to do. After a while, they will realize you are inspecting their work, which will compel them to follow the process. Inspect their work until their performance improves then reduce to periodic inspections to prevent backsliding into old habits.

Recognition and Reviews. The last step in the process is recognition and reviews. Schedule a review with your underperforming broker and discuss their performance. If they are back on track, encourage their progress and if they are still failing, determine the cause and take action. If you see your employee following the process and getting results, give them a little casual praise like “good job” or “attaboy.” Be careful with praise and recognition – it should always align to performance. Too much or too little can send the wrong message.

Everyone knows your tactics, but not your strategy!

Everyone knows your tactics, but not your strategy!

“Everyone knows my tactics, but no one knows my strategy,” attributed to Sun Tzu in The Art of War*

This got me thinking how many business leaders in the third-party logistics industry (myself included) spend too much time focused on the business tactics of our competition.

Then we try to copy those tactics in our own company, hoping against all evidence otherwise, that they’ll make us wildly successful.

We try to create high pressure/high volume sales teams where we’ve never had them because that seemed to work for (insert competitor’s name here).

We want to have the most intensive website, with videos, flashing graphics and all, because (insert competitor’s name here) has one and they’ve grown more than 50% each year for the last three years.

We want to copy the most sophisticated incentive based compensation system used by (insert competitor’s name here) in the hopes that it’ll make star performers out of our average employees.

But copying tactics used by the competition will not make your business successful. Your business will be successful when you have a clear mission, a well thought-out strategy, and then using the tactics that support your strategy and, most especially, have meaning for your customers.

Your Mission is a statement of purpose, what you are in business to accomplish. Your reason to exist at all.

Your Strategy is about the long term direction of the company. It’s about the resources you’ll have, the markets you’ll serve, your competitive advantage, and the expectations of your customers.

Your Tactics are how you do what you do. In the longer term it is how your processes and technology are deployed. On a daily basis it’s about everything from how you open the office in the morning and answer the phones to how you qualify carriers and collect your money. Every one of your tactics should make it easier for your customers to do business with you, and if they don’t you must change them as soon as possible.

Whether you’re starting a new business or your existing business needs a change, start with a clear Mission. Take the time to create, and stick with, a well-reasoned Strategy, and then create your own identity in the marketplace with the Tactics that flow from this process.

* The more accepted translation of this quotation is “All men can see the tactics whereby I conquer, but what none can see is the strategy out of which victory is evolved.” Sun Tzu, The Art of War.

You can raise your business game today. Your Mission and Strategy are unique to your company, but the specific tactics you use are pretty common.

Thankfulness: Crossing Bridges

Thankfulness: Crossing Bridges

As we approach the end of the year and our celebration of Thanksgiving, I wanted to express appreciation to all of our clients, to our colleagues, to our friends and to our industry – an industry that embraces the challenges of growth, of change, of technology, of talent acquisition and of diversity to create a pathway to success.

This past week, I had the privilege to attend the Women In Trucking (WIT) Accelerate! Conference in Frisco, TX. With over 800 attendees (60% increase from 2017), there was an energy and a spark(le) to the conference. Over the last 11 years, the mission of WIT has been to encourage the employment of women in our industry, to promote their accomplishments and to limit any obstacles faced. The sense of empowerment and forward movement was palpable throughout the conference.

Networking

From the steady rhythm of the speed networking session to the reception events to the integrated expo, attendees had the opportunity to reconnect with colleagues and make new connections. Every conversation served to strengthen a relationship and build the foundation for great work in the future.

Unlike other conferences that celebrate only the few, Accelerate! is a celebration of all – drivers, directors, recruiters, salespeople and owners alike. There is a true sense of community and that community is driven by collaboration.

Education and Development

The core of the conference is about development – from sessions and breakout topics (for individual knowledge gain) to affiliate member tools and services (for business development). Growth and advancement are key points to a fulfilling life and career.

For us, at TranStrategy, we were excited to celebrate the first graduates of the WIT Professional Development Certification (PDC) at the conference. Designed with and for the association, the PDC is a 30-course curriculum across Leadership, Success and Personal Brand development. Delivered online and on demand, the program helps the learner to build skills, to look from a more strategic viewpoint at their business and career and to foster growth and empowerment for themselves. The benefits are received by both the individual and organization.

Congratulations, again to Bonnie Supan, Erin Turcotte, Susan Collins and Ellen Voie.

Looking Ahead

I had a colleague ask where I was this past week and when I told him that I was at the WIT conference, he stated that we should have a Men in Trucking conference. Shaking my head, I just had to say, “for a hundred years, that has been called the ‘Trucking Industry’.” The point is inclusivity, not exclusivity.

As we understand and encourage the power of diversity, across race and gender, the industry becomes stronger more adaptable to the changes on the horizon.

It is a privilege and an honor to be a part of the movement and the vision of Ellen Voie and WIT.
Thank you.

Are You a Business Owner or a Glorified Sales Manager?

Are You a Business Owner or a Glorified Sales Manager?

If you are the owner of the business, you focus on:

  • Articulating the vision and developing the right culture
  • Creating a strategy and leading the execution
  • Connecting with customers / prospects and creating a great service offering
  • Hiring great people and developing them into leaders
  • Implementing processes and systems that will maximize productivity for the finance, operations and sales and marketing groups.
  • P&L

If you are the sales manager, you spend most of your time on sales. Since most sales managers are judged solely on sales and margin growth, they better keep focused on sales. Finance and operations will take care of themselves.

A good sales manager is focused on:

  • Connecting with customers and prospects
  • Hiring, training and retaining the very best sales talent (even if they work in the operations or finance group)
  • Developing a great sales process and messaging for the sales team
  • Sales numbers

A Focus on Only Sales Can Slow Growth

As strange as it sounds, focusing solely on sales can limit the growth of your company. In my experience, new sales begin to hurt a company if they haven’t adequately developed their operations, finance and marketing groups.

As an executive coach and business strategist, I help companies accelerate their growth. I work with companies that are at a cross road, where the founder is struggling to get their company to the next level. These companies typically have been around for 10 years and have revenues of $10-15 million.

Often, the owner and his team have an almost obsessive desire to grow their sales, yet they find themselves stuck enough that they hire an outside firm to help.

Building a Foundation for Growth

To help my clients grow, I first assess their current state. I have learned that many, if not most companies have very weak organizational structures because they are so biased toward sales growth.

Typically, the owner behaves more like a sales manager than as a business owner. Since, most startups fail due to lack of sales, the sales bias is justified when the company is new.

Lack of sales kills start-ups, but lack of organization and structure prevents sales growth for small and medium size businesses. To get to the next level, the owner and executive team must change their focus.

Build It and They Will Come

When I help new clients develop an organization and structure, many are initially impatient. They want to discuss sales strategies and nothing else. They are like the top heavy weight lifter at the gym who only works on his upper body – he can’t see that his huge upper body looks silly attached to stick legs.

To get a structure in place, I meet with the leadership team and we agree to the groups, typically sales & marketing, operations and finance. Next, we determine what each group will be accountable for. I always ask the team to agree on just 5 specific responsibilities for each group.

Next, we discuss who should head up each group. This step is always interesting. We are picking the person who should have this job going forward, not who has the job currently. Companies and leadership teams evolve and sometimes the guy who sits in the chair isn’t a good fit anymore – maybe they were never were. This step empowers the leadership team to get everybody in the rights seats and playing to their individual strengths.

So Does It Work?

Developing a solid organizational structure with specific responsibilities sounds boring, but it works every time. I get great feedback from my clients on this exercise. Typical comments include:

  • “Our company feels focused”
  • “The new structure improves cooperation, communication and accountability”
  • “Now that I only wear one hat, I feel energized”
  • “We are much more productive”
  • “This is the foundation we needed to grow”
A Case for Service

A Case for Service

How do you give back? How do you serve those around you? Not just your customers (in providing solutions to their needs), but the folks with whom you interact each and every day. As a leader, your role is not just to direct and make known your expectations, but to provide inspiration, guidance, humility and encouragement to those you lead. As that network expands, there are new ways to serve outside of your organization and for the benefit of many.

Industry Associations

Both Not for Profit and For Profit industry associations are designed to provide a strong network of leaders and knowledge to benefit the overall membership. Balance what you take from the membership and give more than just the annual check and conference registration. These associations are hungry for your expertise and your experience in navigating the landscape of our industry. Others can benefit from your stories, your context and your analysis.

Local/Regional Education

Local colleges, university and trade schools can greatly benefit from your knowledge and expertise. Whether through full course development, seminars, panels or as a guest lecturer, you can support the learning of others. Many schools have courses on operational excellence and supply chain management, but few provide knowledge of the brokerage industry and its impact within the larger supply chain network environment.

This connection to schools can help to shorten the learning curve of our industry and can position your company as a both a supporting entity of educational growth and as an employer of choice upon graduation for many potential new hires.

Community Efforts

Donating time, dollars and other resources to various community needs serves to strengthen the people affected and the community as a whole. Raising hope and building bridges (where both are, unfortunately, absent) can create long lasting encouragement for the individuals helped. While the motivation for volunteering shouldn’t be about how it serves your interests, the potential benefits for you and your company are powerful in building the brand beyond commercial identity, but to become a more holistic entity that has deeper context and empathy.

Mentoring

Mentoring can be focused internally in support of your current team new associates, or it can be focused towards groups outside the company or even the industry. As you look through your own development path, you can identify those people who helped you achieve your success. Providing similar supportive guidance to others can raise the level of conversation, ensure more thoughtful decision making and allow for more personal and professional growth.

You, through your success, have been given a gift. You are given the power to change lives and promote positive values and ideals.

Today is a day where you can utilize the right given to you and make your voice heard in the way our local, state and national political actions are undertaken. Please go out and vote today.

If You Get The Culture Right, The Other Stuff Will Take of Itself

If You Get The Culture Right, The Other Stuff Will Take of Itself

“If you get the culture right, most of the other stuff will just take care of itself – Tony Hsieh, CEO of Zappos.com

Tony Hsieh knows a thing or two about business. He graduated from Harvard, sold his first business to Microsoft and started the internet powerhouse, Zappos all before age 40.

Most business owners and managers would likely agree with Tony – a good culture is critical to the success of a business. However, recognizing the importance of a good culture is very different from actually working on your company culture.

Most business leaders don’t work on their company’s culture because they don’t know where to start. It is much easier to work on tangible, easy to understand problems, but working on the company culture will help you eliminate future problems and position your company for growth.

Culture is Important, But Not Urgent

Unfortunately, for most of us, developing a good culture is one of those “important, but not urgent” activities that never gets works on.

Instead, we get lost in a sea of urgent activities like customer issues, hiring, firing, vendor problems, cash flow gaps and new business development opportunities. After all, these issues must be dealt with now or there will be no business, so the culture won’t matter.

Besides after we close these new deals, we will have plenty of money and time — then we will spend our days philosophizing about the perfect culture, but for now there is no time.

You Get a Culture No Matter What

Your company develops a culture, whether you actively influence it or not. The culture will grow based on the inputs it receives. If you are not actively steering the company toward the culture you want, then you will get a culture you don’t want.

Your company’s culture is like your waistline or credit card spending. When you don’t pay attention, it only goes in the wrong direction.

Think of your culture as your garden. You plant and nurture the plants you want and you weed out the plants you don’t want. As time goes on, you may need to prune back a good cultural trait that was growing too big or in the wrong direction. If you don’t work on your garden, it will grow in unpredictable, crazy and unproductive ways – the same is true of your company culture.

Tony Hsieh is Right

Tony suggests that if you get the culture right, the rest of the stuff will take care of itself. When you have the right culture, the customer issues, employee hassles, and vendor problems go away.

Your company’s culture must become a priority not for some fluffy social good or new age value. You should make your company culture a priority because it will help you grow your business. In my experience, companies that actively work on their culture also have happier owners, employees and customers.

So What is The Right Culture?

Every company will develop it’s own culture. The industry, founders, leaders, employees and a host of other issues will all impact your company’s culture.

There is no right answer, however some desirable cultural attributes are listed below:

  • Visible, inspiring leadership
  • Effective, positive management
  • I want to work there brand
  • Shared values
  • Collective vision / purpose
  • Individual motivation
  • Day to day communication
  • Easy, flexible workspace, inspiring surroundings
  • Great team dynamics
  • Empowered decision making

How Do I Develop the Right Culture for my Company?

Below are some things to consider when improving the culture of your company:

Top Down Leadership

Everybody in the company has the ability to impact the culture, but it is senior management’s responsibility to determine the culture the company should have. Culture improvement must be led by senior management.

Determine the Right Culture

Employee behavior is dictated by company culture. If you want to improve your company’s culture, start by observing employee behavior. Determine the behaviors you want to see less of and the behaviors you want to see more of. You will know your culture is improved when you see the right behaviors exhibited by your people.

Long Term Commitment

Getting and keeping the right culture at your company takes deliberate action over the long haul. There are no quick fixes or silver bullets when it comes to culture.

Get Outside Help

It may make sense to hire outside help when taking on culture improvement. A coach or consultant that is experienced in culture development may be a good investment because they will bring a proven process, diagnostic tools and a fresh perspective on your company culture. An outside expert will also be able to coach you and your employees through the process. As an executive coach, I have worked with dozens of companies on culture improvement. These engagements are not always easy, but the results are always worth it.

A great culture will not happen accidentally. If you want a great culture, you will need to make a conscious effort to create it.

4 Aspects of Leaders to Combat Entitlement

4 Aspects of Leaders to Combat Entitlement

Entitlement – the belief that one is inherently deserving of privileges or special treatment.

Every day someone is trying to find a way into your success. Other brokers are trying to become the transportation provider of choice for your best customers. Some team members are trying to show that they have the skills to replace you. Power is a fickle partner. Knowing how to encourage employees to take on responsibility with a healthy dose of confidence, while keeping entitlement at bay, can be a tricky balancing act.

No one is entitled to your success – it must be earned, nurtured and grown to sustain it. Protectionism is a poor use of resources for sustainability and sows seeds of distrust. Long term success is built on grit, wisdom, collaboration and change. Your leadership must balance these aspects to create a dynamic organization.

Grit

Hard work is the antithesis of entitlement. The consistent effort to prove results and maintain high performance quickly refutes questions like: “Why do we work with his broker?” or “Why do we follow this person?”. Celebrate past success, but focus on the improvements of the future and the benefits that you bring to bear in your relationships.

Wisdom

Contextual intelligence and good judgement ultimately lead to better decisions. Experience, peppered with failure and adversity, lay the foundation for soundness of action. Wisdom allows you the perspective to understand when you are on the right track and when you are off. Trust in your own perspective and those around you to see the moment as well as the horizon.

Collaboration

Organizations, and particularly their leaders, do not exist in a vacuum. New ideas, contradictory beliefs (to limit anemic homogeny) and innovation are energized through collaborative efforts between individuals, teams and joint ventures. Consensus and shared directives accelerates activity and initiatives. While yours may be the final decision, don’t let it be the first and only. Delegate to develop others and to free yourself to focus on core activities that increase your energy and provide the greatest results.

Change

Respect for differences and the power potential they hold allows leaders to make better decisions. One must understand what works well, what can work better and what is not working at all. Change, then, becomes necessary to move forward. Accept that change is an inevitability, as sure as aging and the movement of time. Embrace it as a weapon and a shield to overcome the obstacles that are before you.

Even though you aren’t entitled to succeed, you still have the capacity to find amazing success through your own insights and those with whom you partner.

You Train Everyday

You Train Everyday

Good leaders learn to play a myriad of different roles. They create vision. They communicate that vision. They hire. They fire. They develop teams. They create operational procedures. They create culture. They develop business relationships. They monitor finances, and the list goes on. But one of the most crucial responsibilities of a leader is often neglected: developing people.

If we were to interview future leaders and ask them why they wanted to be a leader within their company, we would probably hear answers pertaining to increased income, prestige, authority, freedom, and personal satisfaction. It would be rare to hear a fledgling leader talk about their desire to be in a position where they can help others better themselves both personally and professionally.

But I ask you, is development of others not a primary responsibility of leaders? Many leaders don’t recognize the need to develop people as one of their primary responsibilities. Others recognize the importance of this responsibility, but they don’t prioritize it or they don’t have the skills or resources to pull it off.

We wonder why our attrition rates are so high. We wonder why we can’t just get productive employees that don’t cause us any problems. Well, productive employees are not so much born as they are made. We need to invest the time, effort, and yes, dollars, to help these people reach their full potential. This is done through TRAINING and DEVELOPMENT.

Training programs come in two distinct forms, formal and informal. Every company has some type of formal training program even if it’s just; here’s your desk, here’s the employee handbook, here’s how to use our TMS, and here’s how to book a load. This piece of the formal training program tends to have a specific time frame attached to it and once it has been completed, there is little additional effort made for further development.

The piece that is often missing from the formal training program is the ongoing professional development that we all need. We need to provide employees the opportunity to grow professionally by providing them with opportunities to learn about skills such as customer service techniques, relationship development, effective communication, time management, conflict resolution, how to influence people, how to negotiate, how to be effective on the phone, having a positive attitude, etc.

The informal training happens on a daily basis as the employee becomes more deeply immersed in, and affected by, the culture of the organization. They are watching everyone else to see what the norms are. How are people treated? What can you get away with? What do people complain about? How are crises handled? What values are upheld and which ones don’t really matter?

You see, you train people and develop them whether you realize it or not. Training is happening constantly in your business. So, you can either just let it happen and evolve on its own (which usually does not end up being anything close to what you want it to be), or you can consciously, with strategic intent, develop all aspects of your training programs. Control the outcome by elevating the training programs to a priority within your company.

Why Your Sales Training Failed

Why Your Sales Training Failed

At TranStrategy Partners, we do a lot of sales training and we have a high success rate. We know sales training can significantly improve sales in an organization.

However, not all sales training works. This article is about why your sales training didn’t work.

The Feel Good Intervention

Sales training is the feel good intervention. When a sales manager sends one of his salesmen to sales training everybody feels good. The salesman is happy that his boss has decided to invest in his sales education. Perhaps the sales training will provide a process, messaging and approach that he never got from his company.

The sales manager gets to feel like an enlightened manager and hopefully get a nice ROI on her training investment. If she suspects she made a bad hire, maybe the sales training will redeem her low performing salesman.

With a little luck, the sales guy will get some silver bullets at class that will enable him to make some monster sales once the training is done.

Five Reasons Your Sales Training Didn’t Work

1. Lack of Management Support

Sales training, like every other corporate initiative, works best when there is management support. A company’s management must do more than pay for the sales training. Trainees need to know that their management values the training and expects their full attention. Ideally, management should participate in the training by introducing the trainer or attending the wrap-up session.

2. Poor Follow-up

To be effective, the attitudes, skills and knowledge gained in the sales training need to be turned into actions. Without implementation, there are no results and the training was a waste. At the end of the training, keep the trainees focused on the agreed upon changes and revise sales processes if required. Reinforcing the training will help the sales team to internalize the lessons from the sales training. Consider bringing the sales training reinforcement into the regular sales meetings.

3. No Competitive Advantage

The freight brokerage business is very competitive and it is important that companies develop a niche where they have a competitive advantage. There are a lot of freight brokers and 3PLs who sell a commoditized service, which makes sales much harder. The positive impacts of sales training can sometimes be limited by a lack of good market strategy.

4. Bad Company Culture

In our experience, sometimes a company’s culture can undermine sales. Training sales people won’t help grow a company’s revenues if the company culture is negative. Company culture is nothing more than the shared values and practices of the company’s employees. Company culture can be tricky and fragile. Even good leaders can find themselves stuck with a bad culture. To get the most out of sales training, first fix the culture.

5. Sales Process Not Aligned to Buying Process

To be successful, a company’s selling process must be aligned to the customer’s buying process. This means a company needs to understand their customers and how they buy freight brokerage services. For instance, if your company is looking for strategic customers, then your sales team should not use a transactional sales process. Your company’s lead generation, messaging and sales channels should also align to the buying process. Obviously, a company won’t be ready for sales training until they align their sales processes.

No Silver Bullet

Sales training is a great way to develop your people and grow your sales, but it is not a silver bullet. To grow your sales, develop a niche, put the right people and processes in place, and get a deep understanding of your customer’s problems and buying behaviors. Then, your company will benefit from a good sales training program.