That Which is Hidden Within

That Which is Hidden Within

“Nothing is more surprising or frightening than what one already knows.” Carlos Ruiz Zafon, The Labyrinth of the Spirits, 2018

Every brokerage business has the potential to become a thriving, successful enterprise. It is only a matter of vision, resources and the dedication to execution that either accelerate or limit the ability to achieve success. Business leaders must recognize and accept that change is a necessary part of growth and the key component to reaching organizational goals. Change must become an inherent and intentional feature of the vision and culture – in deciding how to deploy resources (dollars and people), in communication and in how the strategic initiatives are carried out by the team.

One of the greatest challenges for business leaders to overcome is the identification of where change needs to manifest within the organization. Too often it is identified as a sales issue or a productivity issue, when these are only symptoms of a larger issue related to strategic direction and/or culture. Objectivity is essential in identifying troubles and gaps in operational effectiveness.

Assess Your Business – Are the metrics you use effectively gauging your success?

As a leader, your feelings about the business are valid, but are often clouded by recent or long term operational prejudices. Having clear, and clean, ways to measure activity and productivity allow you to look at the business in an unfiltered way. These metrics should align with the behaviors that you want to encourage – whether phone activity, revenue creation or on time performance. Each of these activities must be tied to an organizational goal. Measurements and metrics that are arbitrary can misdirect your team’s energies and remove the focus from where it matters.

Define Success – Create the Vision

The overall vision for your company, again, needs to be clear and as simple as possible – to facilitate communication and to facilitate understanding. By having a specific point of success that you are trying to accomplish, it becomes easier to see and easier to internalize across the organization. Vision is accomplished through a variety of lenses – the telescope, the microscope and the mirror. The telescope provides a clarity on the long term and horizon-based strategy (tectonic), the microscope provides clarity on the smaller daily initiatives and changes (incremental), and the mirror provides clarity about the people (yourself included) who make the decisions about the future of the company (cultural).

Build Belief – Communicate and Compensate

When the vision presented is both clear and has value, the organization is positioned to succeed. Psychologically, people need to have a defined purpose to move them forward. Without a common goal that makes sense, people will revert to what makes sense for them (comfort) and their compensation design (security). When the vision, purpose, behaviors and compensation all follow the proper order, positive actions will begin to take place. People will find ways to achieve the vision. Innovation and creativity will overcome old obstacles and new challenges. When people know where they are going and work together they can see what the success can look like and take/make the necessary actions/decisions to bring the vision into reality.

Execute – Block, Tackle and Review

Intent and follow through remain the driving principles of execution. If there is truly belief and clarity in the vision, every action that serves this goal is the correct action to make. Review every decision through the lenses of the vision and measure it against the defined metrics to verify its quality against the process standards.

Lather, Rinse, Repeat.

With any process, each time it is completed, one can review what worked and what did not. Identifying performance issues and disconnects outline additional changes that can be improved for the next iteration. It is all there in front of you. It is just the matter of intent. Take control of your present, understand your past and direct the future.

Culturally Speaking

Culturally Speaking

In a recent study by student loan financial firm, Comet, one thousand respondents were surveyed about the dissatisfaction of their current career position. While not the worst industry (Hospitality), Transportation and Warehousing was the third highest rated industry regarding dissatisfied employees. The top five factors for the dissatisfaction in our industry were:

5. Lack of Growth Potential
4. Low Salary
3. Workload
2. Heavy Stress
1. Lack of Appreciation/Recognition

Each of these components is driven by the culture of any organization. With the right culture, each of these components can be turned around to bolster the satisfaction of its employees.

With the right training and development plans in place, employees can have a sense of movement along their career pathway. By providing the requisite skills and tools for each team member, an organization can establish a model of consistency and work ethic that supports the goals of the individual as well as the goals of the overall company.

By aligning compensation to properly defined metrics, employees can have full visibility of their contribution to the team, department and organizational goals. Both control and visibility of earning potential creates a motivation for employees that is tied to organizational expectations and behaviors.

Defining roles and responsibilities for each employee with clear expectations of execution helps to limit the creep of scope and undue additional work. Employees end each day with a sense of accomplishment of their daily tasks and preparation for tomorrow’s needs.

Stress is often felt when people are either unsure of what they are expected to accomplish or do not have the tools/time to fulfill those expectations. By providing clear roles, goals and the tools to succeed, stress can be mitigated and productivity can be increased.

Appreciation is such an important aspect of personal motivation, yet leaders often forget the power of a simple “thank you”. When an employee feels that they are accomplishing their work, the reinforcement associated with recognition of the accomplishment builds both trust and a desire to receive more positive reinforcement.

While our industry has much room to improve when it comes to dissatisfaction, your business can easily buck the trend by establishing a culture that supports its employees and aligns their goals to the overall goals of the company. Communicate, Appreciate, Calibrate and Motivate.

The Quest for Diversity

The Quest for Diversity

The power (and bane) of connectivity algorithms and data insights has helped us, as consumers, to find bounty in our cumulative searches for information. Unfortunately, these same search algorithms push us further and further in one direction or another. Our likes and preferences begin to form the basis of the majority of our information access, leaving us without an important contrary and balancing voice to temper ideas and question one-sided wisdom. While this is particularly true of political and social positions, it also can become a problem in creating a homogeneous business model that lacks necessary diversity.

In recruiting staff, businesses often look for the right fit for their culture – people we would like to have a beer with or folks we want to socialize with outside of work. This can create a strong camaraderie, but it can quickly devolve into a fraternity mentality where equal amounts of time are focused on work and on less productive pursuits such as fantasy football drafts, happy hour parties or questionable behaviors. While company events can be a morale booster, they should be organized with inclusivity and team building in mind.

It will be exceedingly more beneficial to focus on who will challenge you, who will keep your integrity intact and who will be able to make the tough decisions that are necessary to drive growth and manage change. Judge more on character and proven success than on familial connections. Innovation and creativity are the result of diverse ideas and backgrounds. Valuable insights come, not from a single source, but from varied, alternative and unexpected sources.

Look to your anti-self, not at what makes him or her wrong, but what they love to do – that you do not – and what makes that person strong and successful. Find ways to capture their valuable qualities and incorporate them into your organization to provide balance. As a leader, it is your responsibility to inspire those around you – through insight, wisdom, action and support. Foster a culture of diversity to gain valuable insight, help your people grow and help your business become best positioned for changes to come.

Styles in Profiles: Connecting across Psychological Dimensions

Styles in Profiles: Connecting across Psychological Dimensions

When approaching customers, it is essential to understand their buying styles – how they make decisions and how they interpret data to inform those decisions. While every person is unique, there are four basic buying styles from which one can establish sales communication and protocols: Decisive/Dominant; Influencing/Informational; Stable/Steady and Conscientious/Cautious. Understanding your own style (from a selling perspective), in conjunction with others (from a buying perspective), helps to act as a catalyst in the conversation and builds trust.

Dominant and Decisive Buyers

Decisive buyers are driven by the impact of new challenges and the authority to make decisions. They are often dominant in group situations and challenge the status quo. Innovation plays a keep role in developing ideas, but they are also distracted by the ‘shiny new object’ within the market. Decisive buyers focus on the bottom line and will look for a quick, impactful decision so they can move onto the next opportunity. They are often over aggressive and prone to confrontation to protect themselves from being taken advantage of.

When working with the Decisive buyer, be clear, concise and focus on the bottom line. Avoid overly complex explanations of features and benefits and comparative tactics. Focus on success and importance and the ‘rightness’ of the solution.

Influencing and Informational Buyers

Influencing buyer are driven by the acceptance in a collaborative environment. They are trusting and enthusiastic in their approach to new solutions. They look to broker deals, motivate their team and creatively solve problems. The influencing buyer may be more focused on fit and form over function. They are focused on creating an environment of trust and acceptance, but may ignore the details and specifics of what any change truly entails.

When working with an Influencing buyer, it is important to find the shared connections to build bonds and trust. Show how they will be the integrator of any solution. Avoid pressure and immediacy in the decision, but, instead, focus on praise and how the decision will satisfy their need for an environment free of friction and stress.

Stable and Steady Buyers

Steady buyers are driven by appreciation of their dependability and consistency. They are predictable and steadfast in their commitment to execution of work. Steady buyers are reliable and work well within the team structure along defined roles and responsibilities. They are resistant to change and will take longer to accept new processes or solutions. Driven by the sense of security, change should appear more incremental than disruptive for the Steady buyer.

When working with the Steady buyer, position your solution as a logical extension of the current process – one that fulfills current expectations and increases value. Avoid pressure and criticism on any current behavior, but show how the change is both clear (visually) and better (operationally).

Conscientious and Compliant Buyers

Conscientious buyers are driven by standards of high quality and logic. They are highly analytical and focused on precision. They heavily dependent on data, information and structure in making decisions. They are not swayed by emotion or innovation without the requisite research and study to support.

When working with the Conscientious buyer, focus on the details and provide the data, case studies and testimonials of others who have found success in your solutions. Avoid broad stroke statements and implications and never criticize the buyer or their current procedures. Focus on exploring possibilities that logically arise from your solutions and align them to the buyer’s methodology.

Each buyer is different. As such, your approach to each buyer must assert the correct information and communication styles to reach them. Preparation though knowledge of the buyer will help you to deliver a greater impact on their business success and your own.

Breaking Down Success – Simplify to Multiply

Breaking Down Success – Simplify to Multiply

How are you developing your relevance in a crowded marketplace?

Disruption of the marketplace happens when someone has the insight to question the status quo – the vision of what is possible in working out the solution to the challenges within a current process or business model. However, while the idea for change is important, it is truly the proper execution of that idea which defines success into this new paradigm.

Brokerage, as an intermediary business, in its simplest form, is the profitable connection between those with freight to move and those with the capacity to move it. How you make those connections and where you exert energies become your differentiation – your ‘secret sauce’. Some focus heavily on the freight owners, while others focus primarily on the carriers and others still on the technology portals. Ultimately, it is the service provided that makes the controllers of freight and capacity choose to work with a third party. It is the ease of use and the value of such service that makes them choose an option that costs more than connecting directly.

It is less about what you offer than about how your offering satisfies a need (or multiple needs). As a broker you provide access – to freight, to capacity, to information, to solutions. By knowing what the freight and capacity controllers need and how they can improve (financially or otherwise) through your options, you can create a long-term relationship that benefits all parties.

Information and its use are key components to making your business successful. Listening to podcasts, reading books, keeping up with trends and networking with your colleagues all play a part in growing your knowledge and information base. This knowledge allows you to speak directly to the prospects in their own language and with an empathy or their concerns, beliefs and challenges.

What you do differently is less important than how you do it and how you do it well in serving others. Be an expert in your field, but don’t limit your options by that expertise. Keep learning. Keep your people learning. Don’t limit your knowledge confined to transportation, but in other areas where service, connection and relationships play pivotal roles in growth.