A Case for Service

A Case for Service

How do you give back? How do you serve those around you? Not just your customers (in providing solutions to their needs), but the folks with whom you interact each and every day. As a leader, your role is not just to direct and make known your expectations, but to provide inspiration, guidance, humility and encouragement to those you lead. As that network expands, there are new ways to serve outside of your organization and for the benefit of many.

Industry Associations

Both Not for Profit and For Profit industry associations are designed to provide a strong network of leaders and knowledge to benefit the overall membership. Balance what you take from the membership and give more than just the annual check and conference registration. These associations are hungry for your expertise and your experience in navigating the landscape of our industry. Others can benefit from your stories, your context and your analysis.

Local/Regional Education

Local colleges, university and trade schools can greatly benefit from your knowledge and expertise. Whether through full course development, seminars, panels or as a guest lecturer, you can support the learning of others. Many schools have courses on operational excellence and supply chain management, but few provide knowledge of the brokerage industry and its impact within the larger supply chain network environment.

This connection to schools can help to shorten the learning curve of our industry and can position your company as a both a supporting entity of educational growth and as an employer of choice upon graduation for many potential new hires.

Community Efforts

Donating time, dollars and other resources to various community needs serves to strengthen the people affected and the community as a whole. Raising hope and building bridges (where both are, unfortunately, absent) can create long lasting encouragement for the individuals helped. While the motivation for volunteering shouldn’t be about how it serves your interests, the potential benefits for you and your company are powerful in building the brand beyond commercial identity, but to become a more holistic entity that has deeper context and empathy.

Mentoring

Mentoring can be focused internally in support of your current team new associates, or it can be focused towards groups outside the company or even the industry. As you look through your own development path, you can identify those people who helped you achieve your success. Providing similar supportive guidance to others can raise the level of conversation, ensure more thoughtful decision making and allow for more personal and professional growth.

You, through your success, have been given a gift. You are given the power to change lives and promote positive values and ideals.

Today is a day where you can utilize the right given to you and make your voice heard in the way our local, state and national political actions are undertaken. Please go out and vote today.

4 Aspects of Leaders to Combat Entitlement

4 Aspects of Leaders to Combat Entitlement

Entitlement – the belief that one is inherently deserving of privileges or special treatment.

Every day someone is trying to find a way into your success. Other brokers are trying to become the transportation provider of choice for your best customers. Some team members are trying to show that they have the skills to replace you. Power is a fickle partner. Knowing how to encourage employees to take on responsibility with a healthy dose of confidence, while keeping entitlement at bay, can be a tricky balancing act.

No one is entitled to your success – it must be earned, nurtured and grown to sustain it. Protectionism is a poor use of resources for sustainability and sows seeds of distrust. Long term success is built on grit, wisdom, collaboration and change. Your leadership must balance these aspects to create a dynamic organization.

Grit

Hard work is the antithesis of entitlement. The consistent effort to prove results and maintain high performance quickly refutes questions like: “Why do we work with his broker?” or “Why do we follow this person?”. Celebrate past success, but focus on the improvements of the future and the benefits that you bring to bear in your relationships.

Wisdom

Contextual intelligence and good judgement ultimately lead to better decisions. Experience, peppered with failure and adversity, lay the foundation for soundness of action. Wisdom allows you the perspective to understand when you are on the right track and when you are off. Trust in your own perspective and those around you to see the moment as well as the horizon.

Collaboration

Organizations, and particularly their leaders, do not exist in a vacuum. New ideas, contradictory beliefs (to limit anemic homogeny) and innovation are energized through collaborative efforts between individuals, teams and joint ventures. Consensus and shared directives accelerates activity and initiatives. While yours may be the final decision, don’t let it be the first and only. Delegate to develop others and to free yourself to focus on core activities that increase your energy and provide the greatest results.

Change

Respect for differences and the power potential they hold allows leaders to make better decisions. One must understand what works well, what can work better and what is not working at all. Change, then, becomes necessary to move forward. Accept that change is an inevitability, as sure as aging and the movement of time. Embrace it as a weapon and a shield to overcome the obstacles that are before you.

Even though you aren’t entitled to succeed, you still have the capacity to find amazing success through your own insights and those with whom you partner.

That Which is Hidden Within

That Which is Hidden Within

“Nothing is more surprising or frightening than what one already knows.” Carlos Ruiz Zafon, The Labyrinth of the Spirits, 2018

Every brokerage business has the potential to become a thriving, successful enterprise. It is only a matter of vision, resources and the dedication to execution that either accelerate or limit the ability to achieve success. Business leaders must recognize and accept that change is a necessary part of growth and the key component to reaching organizational goals. Change must become an inherent and intentional feature of the vision and culture – in deciding how to deploy resources (dollars and people), in communication and in how the strategic initiatives are carried out by the team.

One of the greatest challenges for business leaders to overcome is the identification of where change needs to manifest within the organization. Too often it is identified as a sales issue or a productivity issue, when these are only symptoms of a larger issue related to strategic direction and/or culture. Objectivity is essential in identifying troubles and gaps in operational effectiveness.

Assess Your Business – Are the metrics you use effectively gauging your success?

As a leader, your feelings about the business are valid, but are often clouded by recent or long term operational prejudices. Having clear, and clean, ways to measure activity and productivity allow you to look at the business in an unfiltered way. These metrics should align with the behaviors that you want to encourage – whether phone activity, revenue creation or on time performance. Each of these activities must be tied to an organizational goal. Measurements and metrics that are arbitrary can misdirect your team’s energies and remove the focus from where it matters.

Define Success – Create the Vision

The overall vision for your company, again, needs to be clear and as simple as possible – to facilitate communication and to facilitate understanding. By having a specific point of success that you are trying to accomplish, it becomes easier to see and easier to internalize across the organization. Vision is accomplished through a variety of lenses – the telescope, the microscope and the mirror. The telescope provides a clarity on the long term and horizon-based strategy (tectonic), the microscope provides clarity on the smaller daily initiatives and changes (incremental), and the mirror provides clarity about the people (yourself included) who make the decisions about the future of the company (cultural).

Build Belief – Communicate and Compensate

When the vision presented is both clear and has value, the organization is positioned to succeed. Psychologically, people need to have a defined purpose to move them forward. Without a common goal that makes sense, people will revert to what makes sense for them (comfort) and their compensation design (security). When the vision, purpose, behaviors and compensation all follow the proper order, positive actions will begin to take place. People will find ways to achieve the vision. Innovation and creativity will overcome old obstacles and new challenges. When people know where they are going and work together they can see what the success can look like and take/make the necessary actions/decisions to bring the vision into reality.

Execute – Block, Tackle and Review

Intent and follow through remain the driving principles of execution. If there is truly belief and clarity in the vision, every action that serves this goal is the correct action to make. Review every decision through the lenses of the vision and measure it against the defined metrics to verify its quality against the process standards.

Lather, Rinse, Repeat.

With any process, each time it is completed, one can review what worked and what did not. Identifying performance issues and disconnects outline additional changes that can be improved for the next iteration. It is all there in front of you. It is just the matter of intent. Take control of your present, understand your past and direct the future.

Culturally Speaking

Culturally Speaking

In a recent study by student loan financial firm, Comet, one thousand respondents were surveyed about the dissatisfaction of their current career position. While not the worst industry (Hospitality), Transportation and Warehousing was the third highest rated industry regarding dissatisfied employees. The top five factors for the dissatisfaction in our industry were:

5. Lack of Growth Potential
4. Low Salary
3. Workload
2. Heavy Stress
1. Lack of Appreciation/Recognition

Each of these components is driven by the culture of any organization. With the right culture, each of these components can be turned around to bolster the satisfaction of its employees.

With the right training and development plans in place, employees can have a sense of movement along their career pathway. By providing the requisite skills and tools for each team member, an organization can establish a model of consistency and work ethic that supports the goals of the individual as well as the goals of the overall company.

By aligning compensation to properly defined metrics, employees can have full visibility of their contribution to the team, department and organizational goals. Both control and visibility of earning potential creates a motivation for employees that is tied to organizational expectations and behaviors.

Defining roles and responsibilities for each employee with clear expectations of execution helps to limit the creep of scope and undue additional work. Employees end each day with a sense of accomplishment of their daily tasks and preparation for tomorrow’s needs.

Stress is often felt when people are either unsure of what they are expected to accomplish or do not have the tools/time to fulfill those expectations. By providing clear roles, goals and the tools to succeed, stress can be mitigated and productivity can be increased.

Appreciation is such an important aspect of personal motivation, yet leaders often forget the power of a simple “thank you”. When an employee feels that they are accomplishing their work, the reinforcement associated with recognition of the accomplishment builds both trust and a desire to receive more positive reinforcement.

While our industry has much room to improve when it comes to dissatisfaction, your business can easily buck the trend by establishing a culture that supports its employees and aligns their goals to the overall goals of the company. Communicate, Appreciate, Calibrate and Motivate.

The Quest for Diversity

The Quest for Diversity

The power (and bane) of connectivity algorithms and data insights has helped us, as consumers, to find bounty in our cumulative searches for information. Unfortunately, these same search algorithms push us further and further in one direction or another. Our likes and preferences begin to form the basis of the majority of our information access, leaving us without an important contrary and balancing voice to temper ideas and question one-sided wisdom. While this is particularly true of political and social positions, it also can become a problem in creating a homogeneous business model that lacks necessary diversity.

In recruiting staff, businesses often look for the right fit for their culture – people we would like to have a beer with or folks we want to socialize with outside of work. This can create a strong camaraderie, but it can quickly devolve into a fraternity mentality where equal amounts of time are focused on work and on less productive pursuits such as fantasy football drafts, happy hour parties or questionable behaviors. While company events can be a morale booster, they should be organized with inclusivity and team building in mind.

It will be exceedingly more beneficial to focus on who will challenge you, who will keep your integrity intact and who will be able to make the tough decisions that are necessary to drive growth and manage change. Judge more on character and proven success than on familial connections. Innovation and creativity are the result of diverse ideas and backgrounds. Valuable insights come, not from a single source, but from varied, alternative and unexpected sources.

Look to your anti-self, not at what makes him or her wrong, but what they love to do – that you do not – and what makes that person strong and successful. Find ways to capture their valuable qualities and incorporate them into your organization to provide balance. As a leader, it is your responsibility to inspire those around you – through insight, wisdom, action and support. Foster a culture of diversity to gain valuable insight, help your people grow and help your business become best positioned for changes to come.